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Music Review: Billy Currington Goes Country And Beyond At The Fillmore

Died April 29, 1981, Los Angeles, California. During the late 1930s, Anderson became the latest in a line of hot trumpet players in the Jenkins Band. He developed a technique of playing in high registers, two octaves above the rest of the band. It was Andersons way of showing off, and getting the girls in the audience to notice him. Wynton Marsalis called Anderson one of the best scream trumpet players ever. After leaving the Jenkins Band in 1937, Anderson played for several bands, and performed at the Apollo Theater in Harlem. During World War Two, Anderson played in a Special Services Army Band, performing for troops on bases across the world. In 1945, he joined Lionel Hamptons Band and then was hired by Duke Ellington, and became a featured player for the Duke during the next 20 years. Ellington re-arranged many of his classic songs to take advantage of Andersons talent for scream trumpet playing. Anderson is heavily featured in one of the most popular jazz recordings ever, the 1956 Newport Jazz Festival. Through the 50s, 60s and 70s Anderson led several bands himself, and recorded several solo classic LPs with various Ellington sidemen.

Pending Legislation Could Cripple Consumer Music Choices

Key among that is the how as in how consumers access and consume content. While some will still buy CDs that house the latest tunes and games, devices and services such as Apple Apple s iTunes, iPod, iPhone and the iPad, Spotify, Pandora Media Pandora Media as well as streaming services from Netflix Netflix and others has had the same impact on music that Amazon.com Amazon.com , Kobo and others have had on book publishing. There have been changes in business models that been beneficial to those companies mentioned above that either saw the future and embraced it. There have also been companies that have struggled along the way. Some companies, like The New York Times, are trying to find their way while others like Newsweek have been forced to embrace an all digital model. Beneath the distributors of content Apple, Spotify, Pandora, newspaper and magazine publishers and so on the ripple effect is also being felt on content creators musicians, authors and the like. While authors are seeing their articles and books downloaded, musicians have seen the playing field shift from consumers having to buy entire albums regardless of the format to individual tracks. No loner does the the music industry book the bulk of its revenue on a per album basis, but rather on digital singles. Despite that economic shift, airplay on broadcast is still the number one determinate of whether a song is a hit or a bust. For generations, music played on broadcast radio was viewed as promotional material for the artists. While companies in other industries pay to get their material on the air through ad sales, musicians and their record labels get their promotions for free. Even today, 240 million Americans still listen to broadcast radio, even as competition for listeners becomes stiffer thanks to MP3 players like iPods and cell phones, satellite and Internet radio. Even as Internet radio grows in popularity and I expect it will given the install base of Apples new iRadio, the costs make profitability difficult to achieve because the government royalty board at the Library of Congress determined that Internet radio stations like Pandora pay six times the royalty rate of other mediums.

The Georgia-born singer likes to start off country but emphatically refuses to stay there. ( Josh Sisk / For The Washington Post ) – Billy Currington ranged as far afield as The Jeffersons theme song and Robin Thickes Blurred Lines. Looking for things to do? Select one or more criteria to search Kid-friendly Get ideas By the close of his 80-minute set at the Fillmore on Friday night, Currington and his versatile, energetic quintet had unearthed the Jeffersons TV theme song Movin On Up and, with stabs at Robin Thickes Blurred Lines and Daft Punks Get Lucky , turned the Silver Spring rock hall into a beat-heavy nightclub. Which is hardly to say that he held back the hard stuff. After opening with the happy-go-lucky I Got a Feelin , Currington dug into the honky-tonk rockers I Wanna Be a Hillbilly and Thats How Country Boys Roll . The traditional-sounding country-western ballad Pretty Good at Drinkin Beer and the mid-tempo Love Done Gone , with its charming Neil Diamondesque ba-bada singalong hook, lifted spirits even higher. It was at this point that Currington introduced the audience to his real-live chocolate labrador retriever, Paco the honorary subject of the mock-misogynistic Like My Dog (He dont get mad at me and throw a major fit / When I say his sister is a bitch / I want you to love me like my dog does, baby / When I come home, want you to just go crazy). Currington escaped the doghouse with a pair of heartfelt ballads: Let Me Down Easy and Dont. Indeed its easy to picture Currington having attempted to rise up the ranks of modern R&B singers. Occasionally, though, Curringtons expansive range led him too far afield. The slick pulsating pop of Hey Girl and We Are Tonight (the title track of his recently dropped new album) sounded forced and flat on Friday. Yet no matter how strenuously he stretches his repertoire, Currington remains centered in songs like Good Directions and People Are Crazy , the latter a worthy contribution to county musics corpus of wisdom literature: God is great, beer is good and people are crazy. Galupo is a freelance writer.